Edgewater by Courtney Scheinmel

For some reason, although I do love the idea of this book along with the striking cover, this book didn’t seem as awesome as I hoped it would. It starts out as an all-American story. Lorrie and her family have ye olde “family money,” and live quite well off of it until the summer before her senior year at her elite boarding school. While at equestrian camp (yes, you read that right), she is called to the dean’s office for what qualifies as “insufficient funds.”

edgewaterWhile I don’t usually feel sorry for characters who suddenly lose their family fortune, and in this case I did get frustrated with Lorrie a few times. She was complaining to the boy who had the exact same thing happen to him just a few years prior. She kept telling herself that at least she was still better than him. Come on, though, I think Sheinmel wanted us to kind of hate her in those moments.

This is also an American story, like I said. I kept drawing parallels between the Kennedy’s and Lorrie’s boyfriend’s family. Because Lorrie is dating Charlie Copeland, the son of an esteemed US senator, and he lives in the house. Because in Idlewald, Road Island, there are houses builders that try to emulate the Copeland estate, and there are families who want to stay as far away as they can from Lorrie’s own crumbling mansion.

I honestly want to hear what you think about this one. A lot of Goodreads reviews talked about how much they adored this book (and as a YA debut, I really like it, too). However the ending of this book seemed too… neat. There’s a scandal in the last 1/4 of this piece that makes me yearn for an ending that is just as messy. So when there’s so much hope and love and acceptance at the end, it just kind of made me think Sheinmel was afraid to pull an R.R. Martin.

 

Advertisements

The Accident Season by Moira Fowley-Doyle

Publication Date:

August 18, 2015

Review:

Absolutely stunning. This novel takes on the idea of ghosts, both real and emotional as they affect an entire family. Cara’s family struggles to survive during the accident season every year. From October 1-31, there’s an increase in scrapes, broken bones, and other more fatal injuries. Like when her dad drowned. Or her uncle. This accident season, even more odd things are happening. For one, Elsie (the weird mousy girl from school) is in every one of her photos. Not just the ones she’s taken in this last few weeks, but in every photo on her phone and in the photo albums at her mom’s house, Elise is there… watching. When she tries to confront Elise about everything, she’s not at school and nobody knows where she is. Or who she is, for that matter.

Then there’s Bea. Her best friend has been acting extra weird around her sister Alice, and she and her ex-stepbrother Sam are both starting to notice. Speaking of Sam, he’s looking at her differently these days too. Just as it’s about to come to a close, Bea reads (in her Tarot deck) that this accident season will be one of the worst.

Filled with ghosts and monsters straight out of a fairy tale, this novel set in rural Ireland was a real treat of a ghost story. It’s anything but typical, and I can’t wait for someone to please please please read this so that I can actually talk to them about it!

Verdict:

Holly Black meets John Green meets Ireland. Boom. (That’s an “I would recommend to anyone” for all of you not familiar with my weirdness).

Have you read this book? Is there anything similar out there that I can read before I lose my mind? Can we start a support group? 

Virginia Wolf by Kyo Maclear, illustrated by Isabelle Arsenault

This is a children’s picture book, yes, but it was so unexpected. I honestly don’t know where I first heard the title, but the book was overall very much about depression and coping/living with someone who suffers from depression.

Plot

Vanessa’s sister Virginia has woken up feeling quite wolfish. She finds no joy in her friends stopping by or the birds singing. Her art box remains unopened. So Virginia sits with her and listens to what she could possibly want. From here she decides to paint a magical world on their bedroom walls that can transport Virginia to a happier place. Virginia notices. The two talk together and eventually Virginia starts to feel less like a shadowy wolf and more like a sunshiny little girl.

Verdict

It’s hard to find a book that deals with mental illness in a positive way. This is nothing like the brusque titles like My Mommy Has Depression (is that a title? I should hope not, but I would not be surprised at all). This one handles the issue with respect and dignity while at the same time giving examples of how to help: listen, talk, be there for that person. It’s a beautiful book.

Bonus

I fell in love with Isabelle Arsenault when I read Jane, The Fox, and Me during grad school. I believe it was for my class, “Art in Picture Books.” In it, a young girl struggles with her weight and feeling inadequate. The manner in which the story is told is both whimsical and heartbreakingly real. I’ve been planning on getting her fox tattooed on me for a while now. At any rate, if you’ve got a minute you should head over to Arsenault’s blog. Since she’s from Montreal, there are both English and French captions on her lovely pictures.